CarePatrol Adds 5 Franchisees To Kick-Off 2019

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CarePatrol, the nation’s largest Franchised Senior Placement Organization has added 5 more professionals available to help families find assisted living in California, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, Texas, and Georgia.

Sam Nazh will be representing CarePatrol in San Diego and La Jolla.  Sam comes from many years of customer service.  Tracy Doeppers will be helping families in Dane County, Wisconsin. Prior to CarePatrol, Tracy had a career as a Project Manager for over 17 years.  David Held will be representing the great state of Texas in the San Antonio market.  David had a career in customer and B2B service for over 28 years.  Mary Ann Pickell will be representing CarePatrol in Lehigh Valley & Upper Buck counties in Pennsylvania.  Mary comes from the non-medical home care world where she personally helped seniors live their best life possible.  Finally, Tammy McGown will be representing CarePatrol in Forsyth and Fulton counties in Georgia.  Tammy comes from a Sales and Operations background and has recently joined forces with Tammy Brewer, a CarePatrol owner in the adjoining territory.

CarePatrol was also recently named the #1 Senior Placement Franchise in Franchisee Satisfaction by the Franchise Business Review for the ninth consecutive year.

Can Exercise Help Mend An Aging Heart?

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Research has found that it is never too late to help make a senior’s heart stronger and helping to lead a healthier life. Research shows beginning a regular exercise routine can make your heart more youthful.  Even exercising as little as four times a week can remodel your heart into a much healthier state.

It has been said that hardening of the arteries affects many of us by the late 50’s.  Hardening of the arteries increases blood pressure and makes it harder for our heart to work efficiently, resulting in heart failure or COPD.

However, not all medical professors agree.  Dr. Benjamin Levine, director of the Institute for Exercise and Environmental Medicine in Dallas, a cardiologist, and professor of medicine at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, investigated seniors who claimed to exercise regularly.

Dr. Levine studied many seniors who reported that they were sedentary throughout their adulthood and compared them to other seniors who exercised for at least 30 minutes two or three times a week, seniors who claimed to work out four to five times per week, and seniors who were considered themselves athletes, because they exercised almost every day of the week.

The results of the study were amazing.  He found that seniors who exercised three to four times a week showed the hearts of person decades younger.  Those who exercised almost every day showed the least amount of heart changes.

The results of his studies were very clear.   They suggest that our hearts have the capability to retain their elasticity for many years of our life.  This seems to only be true if seniors maintain regular exercise.  He suggests that seniors who make exercise a regular part of their day, much like brushing their teeth or getting dressed in the morning, have “younger hearts” and possibly live healthier lives.

Keeping seniors healthy begins with regular exercise.

8 Mistakes Families Make When Looking For Senior Care

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Searching for assisted living or residential care by yourself can be an eye opening experience for anyone especially when your loved one has special needs. Here are some mistakes to avoid when searching.

1. They take facilities operators at their word.

It’s a regrettable situation, but operators and marketers of assisted living centers are sometimes under considerable pressure to keep their facilities full. This can lead to misrepresenting the facts. For instance, some may say their staff is skilled at caring for dementia residents, when the truth is that they have very little such experience.

2. They make a choice because it seemed good for someone else.

Facilities differ greatly in their skills and amenities. A place that’s good for one person isn’t necessarily a good fit for another. Your friend’s mother can be doing well at her facility, but she may have needs much different than your loved one.

3. They choose by appearance alone

It is shockingly common for expensive facilities that look wonderful to be cited for violating regulations. So, beauty should not be your goal, the history of their care is.

4. They listen to the advice of experts in other fields

Your doctor or social worker is no doubt expert in what they do. But they don’t have time to research assisted care and nursing facilities. Often what they know is word-of-mouth. If you get a recommendation from them, ask how often they’ve visited and whether they’ve actually researched the facility’s state survey record.

5. They make their decision based on visiting only one facility.

When searching for assisted living it is easy to look at your first place and say “this is perfect”. However, if you only look at one facility, you have nothing to base your decision against. You should be looking at at least 3 facilities.

6. They make their decision based on pressure from the marketing personnel.

Some marketing representative have been trained in “pushing” you to choose their facility. You do not deserve any pressure at all during this difficult process.

7. They make their decision based on “guilt”.

Having to make this decision is difficult. Too many times families choose assisted living facilities that they would like, not necessarily a good decision for their loved one. For example, you may like that the facility as a pool table or a swimming pool, but your loved one may not care to play pool or go swimming. Choose a place that will be the best choice for you loved one, not just one that you like.

8. They Think that all the facilities are created equal.

All facilities were not created equal. Not all facilities can care for your mother or father. They may all hold the same license type, but they are all different. This is a big decision.

What You Can Do Now

You can stop search alone and give us a call now at +1 866-560-5656 so you can make a SAFE Choice

We review the Care Violation History of every community we recommend BEFORE we recommend them to you.

We Are A Free Service

Determining When a Loved One Requires Assisted Care

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Suggesting moving into an assisted living to an aging parent, family member or even your spouse can be a very stressful and difficult thing to do. In some cases, medical situations makes the transition into an assisted care community necessary such as a heart attack, stroke or Alzheimer’s Disease. No matter what the situation is it can be very challenging to know when the timing is right to make the move or even bring it up.

Your loved one may need the highest levels of care that assisted living can offer if they need assistance in most of their ADL’s or activities of daily living such as bathing, dressing, feeding, showering, grooming and tolieting.

Vision and hearing loss could also be reasons to look into a safer environment like assisted living or independent living with some supervisory assistance. Depression is another situation which may require increase socialization such as in the case of a death of a spouse.

Safety is the key factor in determining the need for senior housing. If your loved one has a history or has been falling lately a higher level of care is highly recommended. Confusion is another factor to seriously consider a supervised living environment. Alzheimer’s and Dementia are devastating diseases which make seniors extremely unsafe living alone.

Searching for care alone can be an emotional process if you do not know where to start or who to call for assistance. The best thing to do when determining the need for assisted living, independent living and memory is to give the professionals at CarePatrol a call. Our Senior Care Advisors are nationally certified in senior care issues and can be a tremendous help in this difficult and confusing time. Our advisors can assess the individual needs of your loved one and “match” them to care options near you that fit your budget. Our advisors also pre-screen and preview the care and violation record of every care option in our network. Call us at +1 877-654-0344 or complete our online form to have one of our advisors give you a quick call. Did we forget to mention that we are a free service also?

IN-HOME CARE FRANCHISOR COMFORCARE ACQUIRES CAREPATROL

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Purchase of senior care placement franchise launches new CEO’s strategic growth plan

DETROIT (Feb. 6, 2018) – ComForCare Health Care Holdings LLC, the premier in-home care provider, and CarePatrol, the nation’s largest senior placement franchise, have entered an agreement for ComForCare to acquire CarePatrol.

Recently backed by The Riverside Company, a private equity firm that handpicked new CEO Steve Greenbaum, ComForCare has more than 200 franchise locations in the U.S., Canada and the U.K. ComForCare’s acquisition of CarePatrol is a first step in realizing the company’s vision to rapidly expand the company’s footprint in the older adult care space through strategic partnerships, organic growth and investments.

“In addition to expanding our service offering and portfolio, our acquisition of CarePatrol illustrates our objective of finding new avenues to carry out our mission to help people live their best life possible,” said Greenbaum. “As the largest senior placement franchise in America, CarePatrol excels at its unprecedented and objective approach to helping families find the right care solutions for their loved ones.”

CarePatrol has more than 150 offices in 40 states, with local senior care advisors who work with families free of charge to find quality, top-rated assisted living, independent living, memory care, nursing homes and in-home care. The senior advisors meet with families in person to assess a client’s care level needs, financial needs and general preferred locations before recommending the best and safest care options.

“Our acquisition by ComForCare creates a partnership that is rooted in our shared mission to be a trusted resource for families and older adults as they age,” said CarePatrol founder and CEO Chuck Bongiovanni. “Together, we will reach new heights in customer service and quality care.”

“When we invested in ComForCare last year, we saw huge potential to become a disrupter in the home care space, especially given the accelerated growth of the industry with aging baby boomers,” said Stephen Rice, a Riverside principal. “ComForCare has been strategic about its organic growth since its inception more than 20 years ago, and we look forward to amplifying this growth through investments in similar-minded companies like CarePatrol.”

About ComForCare
ComForCare is a premier provider of in-home care with nearly 200 independently owned and operated locations in the U.S., Canada and the U.K., helping older adults live independently in their own homes and continue to do all the things they love. The home care company is committed to helping people live their best life possible and offers special programs for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia. ComForCare operates as At Your Side Home Care in Houston. www.comforcare.com.

About CarePatrol
CarePatrol’s founders have been pioneers in the senior placement industry for the past 25 years. Franchising since 2009, CarePatrol has been Franchise Satisfaction winners for eight consecutive years. With 150 franchise partners, CarePatrol is the largest senior placement organization in the country and has franchise territories available. www.CarePatrol.com

About Riverside
The Riverside Company is a global private equity firm focused on making control and non-control investments in growing businesses valued at up to $400 million. Since its founding in 1988, Riverside has invested in more than 500 transactions. The firm’s international portfolio includes more than 80 companies. www.riversidecompany.com

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MEDIA CONTACT:
Pamela Hughes
24-Hour Media Line: 817-329-3257

Common Assisted Living Community Violations

Residents at assisted living facilities expect to receive world-class care from staff members. In some cases, however, organizations are not as reliable as they should be. While some of the shortcomings are minor, others can induce psychological trauma that may take years to heal. Here are the most common violations associated with assisted living communities.

1) Administration of Medication

One of the more frequent violations is a failure to get rid of medications that have expired. In some other cases, administrative staff may also fail to order prescription refills at the right time. Dispensing the wrong kind of medication to patients, on the other hand, is much less common. Expired medicine can be particularly troublesome for residents who suffer from chronic illnesses.

2) Daily Care

Violations might also occur within the general daily routine. In nearly all cases, staff members are assigned to help residents bathe, brush their teeth, and complete a number of other hygienic tasks. In some instances, staff members might also be charged with changing the bedding regularly. A lapse in basic hygiene can lead to discomfort, infection, and other maladies.

3) Food Quality

As with most other businesses that serve meals, assisted living centers can also be cited for a failure to store and serve food at the proper temperatures. Some residents must also adhere to specific diets. Diabetic men and women, for example, must be served food that keeps their blood sugar at the proper level. Any deviation from the approved menu items will be a serious violation.

4) Employee Health

In a community where many of the residents are suffering from weakened immune systems, employees can also be cited for failing to get inoculated against certain diseases. Tuberculosis can be especially problematic, which is why vaccinations are so important. In most facilities, staff members will also be required to get flu shots each year to protect the residents they are caring for. Lax oversight in this regard can get the facility in trouble with the higher authorities.

5) Emergency Plans

Lackluster emergency plans will also lead to citations. Because fires, floods, hurricanes, earthquakes, and other disasters can all crop up without warning, management teams need to have a viable evacuation plan in place. A failure to conduct readiness drills is generally frowned upon by state watchdog agencies. Facilities that have received even one citation will be expected to bring their operations up to code within the mandated timeframe.

Talking to Mom About Assisted Living

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Very few seniors want to leave the homes where they may have been living for decades, but as their age advances, the necessity of doing so may increase until the issue can no longer be ignored. Household matriarchs may be extremely reluctant to leave the family home and all of its associated memories. However, when it is time to have that heartfelt talk with mom, a few words of advice can help to alleviate any difficulties

Consider the Need

The first step in talking to mom about a possible move to an assisted living residence, is to consider the need for it. Make a list of the pros and cons associated with moving. If the advantages are overwhelming, then the talk cannot be avoided. However, it is also necessary to consider what type of facility is required. Large, apartment-type buildings may be ideal, but small, family-based facilities and nursing homes should also be considered.

Ease Into the Topic

Before initiating a deep discussion, it is helpful to nonchalantly bring up the idea a few times several months beforehand. This can take the form of a simple mention of other options after mom has experienced a difficult situation, but you will want to wait a day or two after an incident occurs.

Timing is Important

The best time to talk to mom about assisted living is when she is comfortable and her mind naturally takes her to some of the factors that are making her life sad, difficult or lonely. Gently bringing up the topic at such a time may be received as practical advice instead of as an attack.

Discussion Ideas

The discussion on moving can be helped if you can gather some information on her friends who are already in assisted living. Mom will be more receptive about visiting a center where she will have one or more instant friends.

Other topics that may help in the discussion include a review of the safety features of assisted living and how much easier it is to upkeep the living space. Also, talk about the level of privacy in personal quarters and the social activities available in the public areas.

Finally, give mom some time to consider the information you have given her. If she is still reluctant after a few days, ask for help from friends and family members.

If the incidents prompting a discussion on assisted living are severe or if they occur frequently, a simple mention of moving should be upgraded to a suggestion about touring a facility. In non-emergency situations, you can take no for an answer the first few times.

Fun Activities When Visiting Loved Ones

Enjoying time with a loved one. CarePatrol's list of 53 activities to enjoy when vising a loved one.
A list of activities you can do when visiting your loved ones – #14 will warm your heart!

 

  1. talk about what you both have been up to since your last visit together…
  2. bring photos of family and friends–from days gone by or recent snapshots…
  3. create a photo album, framed photograph collection or poster to hang up…
  4. make a special scrapbook celebrating your older adult’s lifetime…
  5. write or tape your older adult’s autobiography…give copies to the family…
  6. share your own favorite stories and memories…
  7. bring vacation photos, souvenirs, postcards, maps and tales of your travels…
  8. read newspapers and magazines aloud to keep your older adult “in touch”…
  9. look together at magazines that have a lot of large colorful pictures…
  10. subscribe to your older adult’s hometown newspaper and bring it along…
  11. read religious or inspirational articles, magazines or books…
  12. read letters from family and friends…
  13. bring messages from friends recorded on a cassette tape to listen to…
  14. bring a videotaped greeting from family and friends…
  15. help your older adult write or tape letters or send cards out to people…
  16. find a pen pal and help your older adult correspond with this new friend…
  17. create a poster or mobile from pictures cut from magazines…
  18. bring things related to the season or upcoming holiday to do and talk about…
  19. have an indoor picnic with your older adult’s favorite picnic foods…
  20. enjoy a cup of a favorite beverage that you’ve brought in your thermos…
  21. bring the musical instrument you play for your older adult’s private concert…
  22. teach your older adult to play an instrument… Or learn together…
  23. sing…hum…whistle…together…
  24. play “name that tune” with records, tapes or music on the radio…
  25. listen to music together…
  26. play charades…
  27. wind yarn together for a knitting project one of you is working on…
  28. work on a craft project together…
  29. try a new artistic pastime together–such as drawing, painting, sculpture…
  30. make simple gifts for your older adult’s grandchildren…
  31. bring along your sewing basket…button box…toolkit…to organize together…
  32. build a bird feeder or house to hang outside your older adult’s window…
  33. bring along a bird book and see how many different types of birds drop by…
  34. bring out the mending to do while you visit– your older adult’s or yours…
  35. brush, comb or style the older adult’s hair…
  36. pamper your older adult with–make-up, perfume, aftershave or a manicure…
  37. ask for help in planning your garden and look through the seed catalog…
  38. plant and take care of an indoor, window sill garden together…
  39. create a terrarium to enjoy with very little care needed…
  40. play word and trivia games together to keep your adult’s mind alert…
  41. play card, able or board games together– lifelong favorites and new ones…
  42. keeping a running tally of the scores in your own tournament…
  43. do crossword puzzles together…or on your own to see who can finish first…
  44. do jigsaw puzzles–one per visit–or a 1000 piece challenge that takes time…
  45. watch television together and talk about the programs you’ve seen….
  46. keep up on soap operas that your older adult watches and you may miss…
  47. rent a videotape to bring along an old favorite movie or musical…
  48. go shopping from catalogs for clothes, household or frivolous necessities…
  49. go “window shopping” in fancy catalogs filled with things you’d never buy
  50. bring a favorite recipe book to explore or to plan a meal from together…
  51. bring along a treat made from a recipe your older adult said sounded good…
  52. do some baking–or no bake cooking together…
  53. give your older adult a gentle massage with lotion to keep skin soft…

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